Blog Number 40: The #40Days40Blogs Challenge Finale!

Blog Number 40 - Cover

…Aaaaaaaaaand blog number 40! Yay! Although there were times I thought this day would never come, Easter is finally here and I am finally writing and hitting Publish on blog number 40 of my #40Days40Blogs challenge.

It’s been a bit insane, but all worth it in the end. Of everything that I’ve even given up for Lent, ‘being unproductive’ was definitely the toughest. Just in case you missed a few, for blog number 40 I’ve included a roundup of everything I’ve written as part of my #40Days40Blogs challenge:

Travel Catch-ups

Blog Number 40 - Laos

One great thing about challenging myself with #40days40blogs is that it gave me the kick up the butt I needed to finally post all my stuff about my trip around Southeast Asia. I had loads of notes and thoughts lying around, but I just needed the time and dedication to edit and publish. Read more

Things I Learnt From Writing 40 Blogs in 40 Days

40 blogs in 40 days - Cover

Say it with me! One more blog! One more blog! ONE MORE BLOG! That’s right. This blog is number 39, which means that it’s the penultimate blog of my #40days40blogs challenge! It’s been a bit of a roller coaster ride, but here is what I have learnt from writing 40 blogs in 40 days…

1. 40 is a really, really, really large number.

40 blogs in 40 days - #40Days40Blogs
Blog 1: #40Days40Blogs | This Lent, I’m Giving Up Being Unproductive

OK, duh. But, writing my first post about committing myself to this challenge and creating a cute little hashtag for myself made #40days40blogs seem like a great idea at the time. I’d given up chocolate for Lent before and it was fine. 40 days is long, but it’s doable, right?

Skip forward a couple of weeks and I’m realising that writing 40 blogs in 40 days means dedicating three or more hours every day to writing a decent post (and it’s mostly more). That’s a minimum of 120 hours. That’s at least five whole days I’ve spent on WordPress. Read more

A Day in Oxford City Told Through Oxford Dictionary Definitions

Oxford City - Oxford Dictionary: Oxfordian

Dictionary: A book or electronic resource that lists the words of a language (typically in alphabetical order) and gives their meaning. Inspired by a long (and sunny!) weekend in the home of Oxford University, here is a day in Oxford city as told through Oxford Dictionary definitions…

Oxford City - Oxford Dictionary: Muggle
Oxford City – Oxford Dictionary: Muggle

Muggle: A person who is not conversant with a particular activity or skill. Can often be found touristing around Harry Potter filming locations in Oxford.

1990s: from mug + -le; used in the Harry Potter books by J. K. Rowling to mean ‘a person without magical powers’.

‘she’s a muggle: no IT background, understanding, or aptitude at all’

Oxford City - Oxford Dictionary: Ashmolean Museum
Oxford City – Oxford Dictionary: Ashmolean Museum

Ashmolean Museum: A museum of art and antiquities in Oxford. It opened in 1683 and was the first public institution of its kind in England.

‘no, despite the empty tables you may not have a drink in the Ashmolean Museum Restaurant because of some vague excuse about an event or maybe allude to how it’s members only, but probably we’re just a bit snobby.’ Read more

Pico Iyer: Movement is Nothing Until You Stand Still

Pico Iyer

I’ve been back in the UK now for four months. I’m still reluctant to say ‘back home’, but I’ll admit that it’s slipped off my tongue more than once. Like travel writer Pico Iyer says in his TED talk, ‘Where are you from?’ and ‘Where is home?’ are more complex questions now than they once were.

In fact, I’ve been wrangling with that word ‘home’ even since I breathed it in along with the crisp, British air outside Birmingham Airport.

I’ve tried on the word ‘home’ like you might try on a pair of jeans at a high street store; they don’t quite fit, but you try and justify the purchase anyway because you’re planning to lose a few pounds, right? So, they’ll fit in time, right?

And I’ve written. My lord, I’ve written about it! I’ve always found it easier to articulate through the written word than through the spoken word. I’ve typed the word ‘home’ and then hit the backspace key, paused, and then typed it again with quotation marks wrapped around it.

Trapping the letters between two floating apostrophes, like pegs on a washing line, is exactly how the word feels to me.

I meant what I said when I wrote that moving back to the UK is so much harder than moving away – so much more than I anticipated. There were parts I left out from that post. As personal as it was, there was stuff going on one level down, down in the basement, that I didn’t want anyone to see.

Because it is a struggle and it’s a work in progress and it’s more complicated than i thought. I’m rethinking everything. My goals. My dreams. How I should work towards them. How I’m going to get there. What I need to sacrifice in the short term for what I want in the long term.

Anyway, these four long months have been dragging and yet they’ve gone by in the click of my fingers. I applied ferociously for jobs for two months, but then stopped because it wasn’t the right approach and I was getting no where.

I worked on my CV and was more careful about the jobs I applied to. I worked on this blog. I visited other British cities to try and find my feet, eager to play the tourist and find a place to call my own, but I was back in that high street store. I can’t get anything to fit right.

I gave myself a deadline of three months to find a job before I would implement plan B and look at moving away again. But, then I found myself counting down the days until it could be a possibility. Because, if I was being honest with myself, wasn’t it always plan A instead of plan B?

The longer I deliberated whether to stay or go, the more I panicked that I was failing by doing nothing and the more I felt myself slipping into a routine that I had tried so hard to avoid. Freelance work. Sorting out rent with my parents. Doing a lot of nothing

I’ll be honest and say that the last couple of weeks have pretty much been rock bottom, most likely amplified by the passing of the three-month deadline and my 27th birthday. This was not what I imagined for myself after three months back in the UK. This was not what I imagined for myself at 27.

I was punishing myself for not managing to find my dream job and create my dream life within this ridiculous time frame of December to March. I was so frustrated that I had chosen to come home – not just because I was listening to my head, but also because I was listening to my heart – yet, the more I leaned into a life back in the UK, the worse I felt.

‘Why are you back?’ was a question a friend asked me just a few weeks after Christmas. I smiled and talked confidently about my plans, but I was surprised to see that he didn’t seem convinced.

‘Why are you back?’ another friend asked a couple of weeks ago, seeing how down I’d let myself become.

‘I don’t know.’ I tearfully replied.

It wasn’t until this past week that I really started to understand.

You know that quote: ‘Do the thing that scares you’? It’s one that I always think of when I think of travel and I think it’s good advice to live by. But, do you know what scares me most? Living at home with my parents, working two jobs and sitting still for a while.

So, Amy, maybe that’s the exact thing you should do.

I’m beating myself up for being neither here nor there; not fully committed to being back in the UK, yet not ready to just give up and move abroad again on a whim. But, maybe this is exactly where I’m meant to be. Maybe I just need to be still for a while.

That’s where Pico Iyer comes in. A fellow travel blogger commented on previous post and told me that she related to what I was saying, offering up some words of wisdom. She gave me a link to the below TED Talk by Pico Iyer and it completely resonated.

It’s 14 minutes long, so I appreciate if you don’t have time to watch it all, but his speech pretty much articulates everything I want to say about being back. Not just all the stuff about redefining home – that’s a whole other discussion for another day and he’s bang on about that too – but, what he says in the second half about stillness.

Pico Iyer says that movement is nothing unless you can be still. Home doesn’t need to be a nation or a house or even a family. It can be somewhere where you can be still for a little while. Still so that you can collect your thoughts. Still so that you can plan your next move.

That’s exactly what I’m doing. It’s frustrating because I’m so used to moving around and my feet are itching like crazy, but it’s exactly what I need. It’s what I need to do in order to collect myself and my thoughts, before I can move on.

Then, regardless of what comes out of that process, at least I know I’m not making a decision on a whim. Only when you’re still can you really listen to what you want.

I’ve lived out of a suitcase. I’ve carried all my belongings on my back. I’ve hopped from country to country literally without a care in the world. I’ve loved it all, but if you move that fast and that often, sometimes you lose sight of what you’re doing it for.

So, girl, if you can do all that then you can spend a few months at home binge-eating British food and catching up on all the TV you’ve missed! You’ve earned it. More importantly, you need it. You have some figuring out to do.

Notice that the quotation marks have disappeared.

My adventures aren’t over just because I’m taking some time out to reassess. Moving around means nothing unless I am still, somewhere, sometimes, even if it’s just as a point of reference.

So maybe I just need some time standing still.

The Pen On The Table [poem]

Blog Number 40 - Writing

The room is monochrome, classic.

A spotlight cuts silver into black.

In the conical light there is a table.

And on the table, a pen,

A gravity.

Outside, trapped in the ripples, I circle,

A predator, a vulture,

A moth dancing towards the light,

I pace,

I panic,

I prowl.

My arrow-hand stabs into the laser,

Impatient, clumsy.

And retreats again, ashamed, afraid,

I anticipate a burning pain, but it doesn’t transpire.

In the dark, my grey hand shows no blistered skin.

Instead, it itches.

My eyes look up, back at the table,

And on that table, the pen.

A pen with my name waiting in the ink.

My feet push awkwardly beneath quaking legs towards the light,

My toes teasing into the circle,

Like they’re peeling over the edge of a diving board,

They dip into the pool.

It’s warm.

A step. A jump. A dive.

Into the halo until my whole body is coated in white flames.

I’m a burning ghost.

Charging forward,

My phantom-hand extends, hovers and snatches.

The spear is swallowed in the black wave of a shadow-glove,

A lizard-tongue lift with hungry thieves-fingers,

That tighten around the neck.

A child’s greedy fist.

I have the foil.

And I run.

#40Days40Blogs | This Lent, I’m Giving Up Being Unproductive

#40Days40Blogs

This Lent period I’m giving up being unproductive with a #40Days40Blogs challenge. Got myself a little hashtag there and everything, so you know it’s a totally real and not made-up thing.

What are you talking about, Amy?

#40Days40Blogs

I thought that by moving back to the UK this winter I would finally have time to write. I am no longer travelling; I’m sitting still for a little while. Half-funemployed, half-freelancing. I’m still adjusting (read: shivering) to the grey British weather, which means I’m spending a lot of time indoors. I have nowhere to be or go. I have access Wifi and good coffee.

So, I should have all this time to write, right?

Wrong. Read more

Page Traveller is Nominated for the Liebster Award!

Liebster Award Cover

First of all, let me start with a disclaimer: the Liebster Award is definitely not a big fancy trophy. It’s not some kind of Blog Oscar (Blogscar?) or the ‘Digital Nomad’ equivalent of a Grammy. Kanye West isn’t about to come out of the woodwork with a round of, ‘Imma let you finish…’, Meryl Streep isn’t going to get in trouble for a politically-motivated acceptance speech and Adele isn’t going to say ‘fuck’ every five minutes.

What is the Liebster Award?

The Liebster Award is an ‘award’ passed from travel blogger to travel blogger by nomination. The aim of the award is to connect writers together and raise the profile of lesser-known travel bloggers (like lil ole me). Read more

Unpaid Writing | When Do I Stop Working For Free?

working for free 1

Dear fellow writers, freelancing friends, creatives and anyone who has ever had a job; I need some advice. I’ve been writing seriously for around three years now and by ‘seriously’ I mean paid. However, it seems that there are a lot of employers out there who still want me working for free.

They advertise online for freelancers, glossing over the subject of payment until I’ve sent in a CV, cover letter and pitches for articles. Other places are offering full-time ‘paid internships’, which only cover the ‘expenses’ of travel and lunch.

When I question this, the email responses are almost always the same:

‘Sorry, we can’t pay interns / freelancers / writers.’ Read more

16 Things I Would Tell My 16-Year-Old Self

16 Things I would tell my 16-year-old self

We now interrupt this scheduled programme of backpacking-related blog posts to bring you something completely different. Time travel.

I thought that moving back to the UK this Christmas would just feel like my annual Yuletide visit, and that the fact that I don’t have a return flight wouldn’t hit me until well into the new year. Turns out, I really misjudged that one.

Instead, moving home this Christmas feels like going back in time ten years. I feel like my 16-year-old self: reliant on my parents, living back in my hometown, catching up with old friends and going through all my old things (found my Pokémon cards but, sadly, they are worth nothing on ebay). Read more

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